Caxtons is pleased to announce it has recently agreed a three year sponsorship with The Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury

Caxtons already supports The Marlowe through its corporate membership and has now partnered with the award winning theatre by sponsoring its Discovery Scheme, which provides reduced price tickets for 16-26 year olds.

David Gurton, Marketing and Business Development director at Caxtons said "We are delighted to join forces with The Marlowe Theatre in this very worthwhile scheme. Our Canterbury office has a specialist student lettings division, dedicated to providing accommodation for those attending the University of Kent, Canterbury Christchurch University and UCA so this collaboration is a perfect fit with our core market."

Mark Everett, Theatre Director at The Marlowe added "We are delighted to welcome Caxtons as the sponsor of our Discovery Tickets scheme. Discovery Tickets help young people between the ages of 16 and 26 see a wide range of performances for just £10. Together with Caxtons, we can help more young people develop a love of theatre and live performance."

The Marlowe Discovery Scheme provides heavily discounted tickets for top-ticket shows. The scheme emulates an initiative that was successfully introduced by the National Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company some years ago.

Whether a novice or already a devotee, the scheme is designed to attract and enthral a younger audience and to inspire a fresh generation to become regular followers of the wonderful world of theatre.

Discovery Tickets can be purchased for seats in price band A, and with shows spanning theatre, comedy and music, there is always something to please every taste.

Caxtons is keen to support the scheme whenever and wherever it can and has recently commissioned a single decker bus back to promote the benefits of Discovery Tickets. The bus (21a) runs from Hales Place in Canterbury to The University of Kent, a route that is well used by students living in and around the city.

Three of the student lettings team from Caxtons recently joined Samantha Scott, Development Manager at The Marlowe, to cement the relationship and launch the scheme.

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(l to r) Kevin Tubb, Brittany Holland, Daniel Eley all from Caxtons' Student Lettings division with Samantha Scott, Development Manager at The Marlowe

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors created RICS Matrics to nurture the interests of members whether new to, or those not long in the profession of surveying.

RICS Matrics Kent members have recently voted for their new local group board and Caxtons' staff have been elected to places at the top table.

Caxtons has always supported its trainees and graduate members of staff and is delighted that the following staff have been elected to the board:

James Roberts, a Commercial Agency Manager at Caxtons in Canterbury has been elected as Vice Chariman. James specialises in acquiring and disposing of commercial property for a range of clients.

Kazeem Agboola has been re-appointed as Treasurer. Kazeem's day job is a Commercial Property Manager and he is based in Caxtons' Gravesend Head Office in Windmill Street.

Tatenda Metzger has been elected as the Student Liaison member. She is a graduate surveyor in the Professional Department at Head Office.

Finally, Tom Foster has been appointed as a committee member (without portfolio) and is a graduate surveyor in the Building Department in Gravesend.

The 40 local RICS Matrics groups provide a network, support and a voice for its members as well as a source of energy for the surveying profession.

It is youthful, forward thinking and provides an environment of inclusion for its newest members to grow and feel like an integral part of the RICS.

Activities at the Kent group includes a monthly event and sporting activities for fun and friendships but focuses on networking to engender long lasting contacts with other professionals and developing their skills.

It's happened. The UK has, in the majority, voted to leave the EU. What wasn't quite so predictable was the resignation of the Prime Minister. So what now? A Tory Party leadership race throughout the summer and new Prime Minister by the autumn.

After a long, hard fought and sometimes bloody battle the metaphorical war has been won. Some would say by dye in the wool old fogies whose heads were firmly fixed in the sand and the twentieth century, whilst others that Brexit voters were the brave pioneers, the backbone of what the British Isles was founded upon.

What impact will this have on the property sector? Initially the markets plummeted and Sterling dropped against the US dollar. While 'nobody knows' is a phrase that may be heard often over the coming months and years, in truth the following is still speculation, researched, gathered and repeated comment from property pundits over the past months; but it may help to give a broad overview of what might happen in the near(ish) future.

However, what everyone agrees upon is that uncertainty reigns.

In the months running up to the referendum we saw a change in areas of the property sector that may have been a flash in the pan but could herald a permanent change.

Some of the larger institutional investors held back from committing to sizeable commercial purchases, which provided a window for smaller investors to gain a foothold in London and other major cities around the country.

In referendum week, Rightmove reported that the residential housing market achieved a milestone in May 2016, with properties selling in an average of 57 days – the fastest time recorded over the previous twelve months.

Once things have quietened down, the supply and demand aspect of the home-grown domestic property market suggests there may be little or no change post Brexit. People in Lincolnshire will still buy and rent property and so the merry-go-round will continue. Of course if interest rates go up it will make life tough for those who did not factor in rate increases when they took out their mortgage.

Investors in buy-to-let property already incorporate the affects of additional stamp duty on second properties and

the phasing out of mortgage interest relief (due to begin in 2017). In order to gain from more beneficial regulations, many serious investors have converted their private holdings into businesses.

London is an anomaly. The top end of this particular market has been shaped by foreign investors - often buy-to-leavers, who purchase with confidence of an ever-increasing return and a safe haven for their money - but in the past few months it has seen prices fall as fewer buyers fight for their piece of the golden goose.

Many may welcome this slowdown and view it as an adjustment to an overheated market. Wealthy Europeans may no longer chose to invest in the London Property market - but then again they may come back in their droves – nobody really knows?

The property sector has always been influenced by the economy in general and uncertainty is not a climate in which to make major decisions, so the outcome of our exiting the EU will be dependent upon how inventive we can be as a nation to 'go it alone'.

We must all remember that property is a long-term investment and that prices can go down as well as up. Whilst there may be a short-term shock to the sector, over the medium and longer-term prices and yields will adjust and it is supply and demand that drives the property market.

In amongst all the uncertainty, and in the run-up to the vote, Société Générale confirmed that it was signing on a further 8,000 square feet at its current site in St James Square and is committed to a new and larger Canary Wharf office with a move-in date in 2019.

Banks still need to lend and businesses and individuals still need to borrow. In London developers may decide to build for the home market rather than overseas investors; in the rest of the country there may be an easing of bottlenecks caused by the Freedom of Movement of Workers, which is a fundamental principle of the Treaty enshrined in Article 45 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. But all this is speculation.

Who can predict whether or not we will become the go-to country for foreign property investment? Add to that the attraction of a country on the doorstep of Europe and not bound by the red tape of numerous regulations? Nobody knows.

We will survive.

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